Raj Persaud in conversation - the podcasts
Are those sympathetic to violent protest and terrorism suffering from psychological problems?

Professor Kamaldeep Bhui works as a clinical academic psychiatrist in London. He qualified in Medicine at the United Medical Schools of Guy's & St Thomas in 1988, and subsequently worked at the Maudsley, Institute of Psychiatry, Guy's, King's, St Thomas' Hospitals and Medical Schools being appointed to his first consultant clinical academic post as a senior lecturer in 2000.

He was appointed Professor in 2003 at QMUL. Previously he was a Wellcome Training Fellow in Health Services Research and Senior Medical Officer in the policy research programme at Department of Health. He is Director at the Cultural Consultation Service at QMUL (Culturalconsultion.org) and Director of MSc Psychological Therapies, MSc Transcultural Mental Healthcare at QMUL and MSc Mental Health & Law.

He is also the co-founder of Careif (www.careif.org), an international mental health charity that promotes work for young people and their health through culture, sport and arts.

Professor Bhui is President of WACP and Public Health Lead at the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

He is editor of British Journal of Psychiatry, and International Journal of Culture and Mental Health.

He is on the editorial board of Transcultural Psychiatry, Ethnicity and Health, Int.J.Social Psychiatry, and Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

His recent paper is titled: 

Pathways to sympathies for violent protest and terrorism

by 

Kamaldeep Bhui, Maria Joao Silva, Raluca A. Topciu and Edgar Jones

and is published in The British Journal of Psychiatry

 

From the paper:

Radicalisation is proposed to explain why some individuals begin to support and take part in violent extremism. However, there is little empirical population research to inform prevention, and insufficient attention to the role of psychiatric vulnerabilities. In this study a cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of Pakistani and Bangladeshi men and women from two English cities were investigated. Depressive symptoms were associated with a higher risk of Sympathies for Violent Protest and Terrorism.

Direct download: raj_persaud_talks_to_kamaldeep_bhui.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:14pm UTC

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